Garuda Linux Hyprland Edition

Shortest path to a usable cutting edge Linux desktop

Jeremy Cheng

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Over the years, I have grown a love-hate relationship with tiling window managers. They are more customizable, lightweight, workflow enhancing, and when it’s finally setup the way I like it, I visually and in all practicalities love it to pieces. However, to get a newly adopted tiling window manager to the way I like it, or in fact, for it to be any sorts of usable at all, is a long and tedious process until of course, I have setup my first machine and can then just push configs and scripts to github/gitlab for future machines that I setup.

On another note, I have been staying away from Wayland, the supposedly shinier, newer, leaner, and more performant display server/compositor/protocol (whatever you want to call it) that’s slated to replace the old and clunky X which consists of architectural components and code that dates back to the early 90’s and maybe even earlier. It’s not that I don’t enjoy a leaner display server/compositor nor is it that I don’t enjoy having scrolling and video/animation playback to be buttery smooth. It’s that to this day, most of the world develop graphical applications against X. It’s like switching from Pulse Audio to Pipewire. You don’t know how famous I am among my co-workers for having Zoom’s audio input/output break on important meetings. The sentiment was the same for early adopters of Wayland. Screenshare? Not compatible. Remote desktop? Not compatible. Synergy/Barrier? No joy! The aforementioned issues are just some of the less common problems. There were many more day-to-day average Joe type use cases that were broken when running Wayland like say, if you had an Nvidia GPU. It’s not that I didn’t give it a chance either. Everytime I gave Wayland a try, some deal breaking issue always brought me back to X.

However, recently, even the notoriously conservative Debian has made Wayland its default Gnome compositor. This is a cue for me that Wayland is finally mature enough to where it’s not long until X will slowly phase out especially given that X is not really in active development anymore and some of the earlier mentioned Wayland problems are progressively being fixed. So to ensure that I am future proof, I figured, I needed to get on board with a Wayland native tiling window manager. There are…

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